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Today’s equity opportunities
Attractive valuations
Dr. David Kelly discusses the extreme valuation gap between U.S. equities and Treasuries
Active management
Market conditions have improved for active stock pickers
J.P. Morgan Equity Income Fund (HLIEX)
Manager video
Discover the three criteria we look for in dividend-paying stocks
Manager Q&A
Learn why quality and risk management matter with dividend investing
Fund profile
See the fund’s top decile performance and bottom decile volatility
J.P. Morgan Large Cap Growth Fund (SEEGX)
Manager video
Explore three key risks – and how we seek to manage them
Manager Q&A
Get our take on investing successfully across volatile markets
Fund profile
View the fund’s consistent track record over time
J.P. Morgan Value Advantage Fund (JVASX)
Manager video
Find out how our flexible approach may benefit clients
Manager Q&A
Invest opportunistically across market caps and risk profiles
Fund profile
See how the fund performed in up and down markets

The price of equity securities may rise or fall because of changes in the broad market or changes in a company’s financial condition, sometimes rapidly or unpredictably. These price movements may result from factors affecting individual companies, sectors or industries selected for the fund’s portfolio or the securities market as a whole, such as changes in economic or political conditions. Equity securities are subject to “stock market risk” meaning that stock prices in general (or in particular, the prices of the types of securities in which a fund invests) may decline over short or extended periods of time. When the value of a fund’s securities goes down, an investment in a fund decreases in value.

The fund may invest in derivatives which may be riskier than other types of investments because they may be more sensitive to changes in economic or market conditions than other types of investments and could result in losses that significantly exceed the fund’s original investment. Many derivatives create leverage thereby causing the fund to be more volatile than it would be if it had not used derivatives.

Mid-cap funds typically carry more risk than stock funds investing in well-established "blue-chip" companies. Historically, mid-cap companies' stock has experienced a greater degree of market volatility than the average stock.

The fund may invest a portion of its securities in small-cap stocks. Small-capitalization funds typically carry more risk than stock funds investing in well-established "blue-chip" companies since smaller companies generally have a higher risk of failure. Historically, smaller companies' stock has experienced a greater degree of market volatility than the average stock.