Use the Guide
Browse the Guide
Portfolio Discussions
Dr. Kelly's Review
Use the Guide
Guide to Retirement
Discussions
Client Presentation
Headlines
Employment & the Fed
Navigating fiscal uncertainty
European Markets
U.S. Recovery
Headlines
Employment & the Fed
Navigating fiscal uncertainty
European Markets
U.S. Recovery
Featured Topics
Fixed Income
Income Opportunities
U.S. Equities
Global Growth
Looking for other topics? Visit the Library
Choose a Shortcut

U.S. Small Company Fund - A (JTUAX)

U.S. Small Company Fund - A (JTUAX)
Overview Performance and Ratings Holdings and Details Management Dividends and Capital Gains Fees and Expenses Sales Resources
Dennis Ruhl
Dennis Ruhl| Managing Director Biography

Dennis S. Ruhl, managing director, is the head of the U.S. Behavioral Finance Small Cap Equity Group. A member of the team since 2001, Dennis also acts as a portfolio manager and leads quantitative research and implementation for the broader U.S. Behavioral Finance Team. An employee since 1999, Dennis previously worked on quantitative equity research (focusing on trading) as well as business development. Dennis holds dual bachelor's degrees in mathematics and computer science and a master's degree in computer science, all from MIT. He is the current New York and former National Chair of the Board of Minds Matter, a non-profit mentoring organization, and is also a former board member of the MIT Club of New York and regional vice chair of the MIT Educational Council. Dennis is a CFA charterholder.

Education
    B.A., Mathematics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology B.A., Computer Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Experience
  • Industry Experience, 16 Years
  • Firm Experience, 16 Years
  • Fund Experience, 11 Years
Other funds managed by Dennis Ruhl:

The Fund may invest a portion of its securities in small-cap stocks. Small-capitalization funds typically carry more risk than stock funds investing in well-established "blue-chip" companies since smaller companies generally have a higher risk of failure. Historically, smaller companies' stock has experienced a greater degree of market volatility than the average stock.

Total return assumes reinvestment of income.