Use the Guide
Browse the Guide
Portfolio Discussions
Dr. Kelly's Review
Use the Guide
Guide to Retirement
Discussions
Client Presentation
Headlines
Employment & the Fed
Navigating fiscal uncertainty
European Markets
U.S. Recovery
Headlines
Employment & the Fed
Navigating fiscal uncertainty
European Markets
U.S. Recovery
Featured Topics
Fixed Income
U.S. Equities
Income Opportunities
Global Growth
Looking for other topics? Visit the Library
Choose a Shortcut

China Region Fund - A (JCHAX)

China Region Fund - A (JCHAX)
Overview Performance and Ratings Holdings and Details Management Dividends and Capital Gains Fees and Expenses Sales Resources
Howard Wang
Howard Wang| Managing Director Biography

Howard Wang, is a regional investment manager and head of the Greater China team which forms part of the Pacific Regional Group in Hong Kong. He joined the firm in 2005. Immediately before joining the firm Howard spent eight years with Goldman Sachs. He began his career with Goldman Sachs in Hong Kong as an analyst in the principal investment area. Howard was later appointed as an executive director of Goldman's principal strategies team where he had primary responsibility for building, monitoring and trading the department's Taiwanese convertible bond portfolio. He moved to Taiwan in 2002 to build Goldman's Taiwan equities business, and was appointed general manager of the Taipei office in 2003 and managing director in 2004. Prior to joining Goldman Sachs, Howard was an analyst with private equity investors at Morgan Stanley Capital Partners and began his career in 1995 as an analyst with Lazard Frères in New York.

Education
  • B.A., summa cum laude, Economics, Yale University
Experience
  • Industry Experience, 19 Years
  • Firm Experience, 9 Years
  • Fund Experience, 7 Years
 
Emerson Yip| Biography

Experience
  • Industry Experience, 20 Years
  • Firm Experience, 8 Years
  • Fund Experience, 6 Years

International investing involves a greater degree of risk and increased volatility. Changes in currency exchange rates and differences in accounting and taxation policies outside the U.S. can raise or lower returns. Also, some overseas markets may not be as politically and economically stable as the United States and other nations. The risks associated with foreign securities are magnified in countries in "emerging markets." These countries may have relatively unstable governments and less-established market economies than developed countries. Emerging markets may face greater social, economic, regulatory and political uncertainties. These risks make emerging market securities more volatile and less liquid than securities issued in more developed countries.

Mutual funds are subject to certain market risk. Investment returns and principal value of an investment will fluctuate so that an investor's shares, when redeemed, may be worth more or less than their original cost.