Use the Guide
Browse the Guide
Portfolio Discussions
Dr. Kelly's Review
Use the Guide
Guide to Retirement
Discussions
Client Presentation
Headlines
Employment & the Fed
Navigating fiscal uncertainty
European Markets
U.S. Recovery
Headlines
Employment & the Fed
Navigating fiscal uncertainty
European Markets
U.S. Recovery
Featured Topics
Fixed Income
U.S. Equities
Income Opportunities
Global Growth
Looking for other topics? Visit the Library
Choose a Shortcut

Intrepid Advantage Fund - Select (JIISX)

Intrepid Advantage Fund - Select (JIISX)
Overview Performance and Ratings Holdings and Details Management Dividends and Capital Gains Fees and Expenses Sales Resources
Dennis Ruhl
Dennis Ruhl| Managing Director Biography

Dennis S. Ruhl, managing director, is the head of the U.S. Behavioral Finance Small Cap Equity Group. A member of the team since 2001, Dennis also acts as a portfolio manager and leads quantitative research and implementation for the broader U.S. Behavioral Finance Team. An employee since 1999, Dennis previously worked on quantitative equity research (focusing on trading) as well as business development. Dennis holds dual bachelor's degrees in mathematics and computer science and a master's degree in computer science, all from MIT. He is the current New York and former National Chair of the Board of Minds Matter, a non-profit mentoring organization, and is also a former board member of the MIT Club of New York and regional vice chair of the MIT Educational Council. Dennis is a CFA charterholder.

Education
    B.A., Mathematics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology B.A., Computer Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Experience
  • Industry Experience, 15 Years
  • Firm Experience, 15 Years
  • Fund Experience, 2 Years
Other funds managed by Dennis Ruhl:
Jason Alonzo
Jason Alonzo| Vice President Biography

Jason Alonzo, executive director, is a senior portfolio manager of the US Behavioral Finance Equity group that is responsible for the Intrepid strategies. Jason was part of the initial research and implementation in launching the large cap strategies, and has been part of the large cap team since inception in 2003. Jason previously worked as an Investment Assistant in the US Equity group, and prior to that as an analyst in the Internal Consulting Services program, completing assignments in Corporate Technology, LabMorgan, Credit Derivatives and ultimately the US Equity group. Jason received a B.S. in Management and Technology from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in 1999.

Education
  • B.S., Management/Technology, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Experience
  • Industry Experience, 14 Years
  • Firm Experience, 14 Years
  • Fund Experience, 9 Years
Other funds managed by Jason Alonzo:
Garrett Fish
Garrett Fish| Executive Director Biography

Garrett Fish, executive director, is a portfolio manager in the U.S. Equity Group. An employee who worked with Jardine Fleming from 1994 to 1997 and joined the current organization in 2002, Garrett is the portfolio manager of the Luxembourg-domiciled JPM America Large Cap Fund and the UK-based JPMF American Investment Trust. From 1997 through 2001, he was with Merrill Lynch Investment Managers in London as a U.S. equity fund manager. Garrett has also worked with Aetna Capital Management, where he served as an account manager. Garrett holds a B.A. in Japanese history from Bates College and is also a CFA charterholder.

Education
    B.A., Japanese history, Bates College
Experience
  • Industry Experience, 23 Years
  • Firm Experience, 12 Years
  • Fund Experience, 2 Years

Formerly JPMorgan Intrepid Multi Cap Fund.

Mid-cap funds typically carry more risk than stock funds investing in well-established "blue-chip" companies. Historically, mid-cap companies' stock has experienced a greater degree of market volatility than the average stock.

The Fund may invest a portion of its securities in small-cap stocks. Small-capitalization funds typically carry more risk than stock funds investing in well-established "blue-chip" companies since smaller companies generally have a higher risk of failure. Historically, smaller companies' stock has experienced a greater degree of market volatility than the average stock.

There is no assurance that behavioral finance strategies will protect against the loss of capital.